Teach-Ins and Nonviolent Movements

Antiwar protesters in January 1965, uwdigitalcollections - Student protesters marching down Langdon Street, CC BY 2.0

Antiwar protesters in January 1965, uwdigitalcollections – Student protesters marching down Langdon Street, CC BY 2.0

This week in nonviolent history, we celebrate the effective and versatile tactic of the teach-in. One of the largest teach-ins during the Vietnam War, for example, was held on May 21st-23rd, 1965 at UC Berkeley with 10-30,000 students attending. The State Department was invited to send a representative, but declined. An empty chair was set on the stage during the teach-in with a sign that read “Reserved for the State Department” taped to the back.

“A teach-in is similar to a general educational forum on any complicated issue, usually an issue involving current political affairs. The main difference between a teach-in and a seminar is the refusal to limit the discussion to a specific frame of time or a strict academic scope. Teach-ins are meant to be practical, participatory, and oriented toward action. While they include experts lecturing on the area of their expertise, discussion and questions from the audience are welcome.”
– Wikipedia

As a nonviolent action, a teach-in is often offered in the context of protest or resistance. The first teach-in, for example, was held at the University of Michigan in 1965 to protest the Vietnam War, and was organized as an alternative to the previously planned teachers’ strike. Instead of going on strike, the professors held a teach-in, showing up at the university, but teaching about the Vietnam War instead of their regular curriculum.

Teach-ins are a powerful method of nonviolent action that have been used in a wide variety of situations. In the United States in the 1990s, a new series of teach-ins focused on the corporatization of education and on corporate power generally, called the Democracy Teach-Ins, paved the way for the massive demonstrations, including the 1999 Seattle WTO protests; and the 2003 national Books Not Bombs student strike. In 2011, Occupy Wall St. used teach-ins to inform, educate, and mobilize the massive protests against the 1%, bank bailouts, and wealth inequality.

The year, Campaign Nonviolence is inviting teachers, peace educators, nonviolence trainers, and activists to offer teach-ins during the Campaign Nonviolence Week of Actions September 18-25th, 2016.

Imagine . . . where could you offer a teach-in? How about a de-escalation training with your local police department? Or perhaps a teach-in on climate change at your city council meeting? What if you offered a teach-in on living wages to your local business associations? Maybe you could offer nonviolent communication training for the youth groups in your area . . . the possibilities are endless, and they all help to bring the skills and knowledge of a culture of active nonviolence into our communities.

Join the growing movement for a culture of active nonviolence by organizing a teach-in in your area or online during the Week of Actions September 18-25th.

Learn more about the history on Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teach-in

____________________________

ARivera New Hatuthor/Activist Rivera Sun, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of The Dandelion Insurrection, Billionaire Buddha and Steam Drills, Treadmills, and Shooting Stars, the cohost of Love (and Revolution) Radio, and the cofounder of the Love-In-Action Network. She is a trainer and social media coordinator for Campaign Nonviolence and Pace e Bene. Sun attended the James Lawson Institute on Strategic Nonviolent Resistance in 2014 and her essays on social justice movements appear in Truthout and Popular Resistance. www.riverasun.com

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Remembering Nonviolent History: Blue Revolution – Kuwaiti Women Gain Suffrage

KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT:  Kuwaiti women demonstrate in front of the parliament building in Kuwait City to demand their political rights, 07 March 2005. As a battle has raged in the Gulf emirate over political rights for its disenfranchised women, female activists and their liberal supporters staged the rally the morning the parliament was scheduled to discuss a government request to speed up the debate on a women's rights bill. The bill, approved by the cabinet last May and opposed by Islamic hardliners, calls for amending article one of the 1962 electoral law which limits voting and candidacy to male citizens whereas the constitution stipulates gender equality.  AFP PHOTO/YASSER AL-ZAYYAT  (Photo credit should read YASSER AL-ZAYYAT/AFP/Getty Images)

KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT: Kuwaiti women demonstrate in front of the parliament building in Kuwait City to demand their political rights, 07 March 2005. As a battle has raged in the Gulf emirate over political rights for its disenfranchised women, female activists and their liberal supporters staged the rally the morning the parliament was scheduled to discuss a government request to speed up the debate on a women’s rights bill. The bill, approved by the cabinet last May and opposed by Islamic hardliners, calls for amending article one of the 1962 electoral law which limits voting and candidacy to male citizens whereas the constitution stipulates gender equality. AFP PHOTO/YASSER AL-ZAYYAT (Photo credit should read YASSER AL-ZAYYAT/AFP/Getty Images)

This week in nonviolent history commemorates the successful conclusion of Kuwait’s Blue Revolution. On May 17th, 2005, Kuwaiti women gained suffrage after more than 40 years of struggle. The women used a wide variety of approaches to achieve their goals, including lobbying, introducing repeated legislation, protests and demonstration, marches, rallies, and mock elections.

Like many women’s suffrage movements around the world, the Kuwaiti women escalated their actions and campaigns, shifting from legislative and legal efforts into nonviolent direct action. The history of their multi-decade effort is complex, spanning from the 1960s when Kuwait won independence from the United Kingdom, through the Iraqi occupation in 1990-1991,and onward another 15 years until a series of nonviolent actions, changing political climate, and increased pressure finally won the vote for the women of Kuwait.

The movement first began to apply bolder methods of nonviolent action in 1996 when 500 women stopped working for an hour to demand suffrage. Then, as the Global Nonviolent Action Database reports, “In 2002, several women held a demonstration near two voter registration centers in Kuwait. The demonstrators waved banners outside the two centers, but were eventually asked to leave. Kuwaiti women continued to be very assertive in 2003. There were reports of demonstrations involving more than 1,000 women in a country with a total population of two million. The campaign also unsuccessfully sued both the Minister of the Interior and the Speaker of Parliament. During the elections of 2003, women established mock ballots that allowed hundreds of women to cast symbolic votes for real candidates.”

In March of 2005, after highly visible and captivating actions, 1,000 demonstrators gathered outside of the Kuwaiti parliament to continue their demand for basic voting rights. Many women wore pale blue to represent the struggle for suffrage, leading to the moniker, “The Blue Revolution.”  On May 17th, Kuwaiti parliament passed the long-awaited suffrage bill, granting women the right to vote and run for elected office.

The Blue Revolution is part of the Color Revolutions, a series of nonviolent movements that erupted from the 1970s to present day, with a peak in the late 90s and early 2000s. These movements include, the Carnation Revolution in Portugal, the People Power Revolution (also known as the Yellow Revolution) in the Philippines, the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, the Rose Revolution in Georgia, the Orange Revolution in the Ukraine, the Cedar Revolution in Lebanon, the Denim Revolution in Belarus, the Green Revolution in Iran, among many others. The use of identifiable colors and symbols was often used as an intentional tactic of solidarity and visible protest.

____________________________

ARivera New Hatuthor/Activist Rivera Sun, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of The Dandelion Insurrection, Billionaire Buddha and Steam Drills, Treadmills, and Shooting Stars, the cohost of Love (and Revolution) Radio, and the cofounder of the Love-In-Action Network. She is a trainer and social media coordinator for Campaign Nonviolence and Pace e Bene. Sun attended the James Lawson Institute on Strategic Nonviolent Resistance in 2014 and her essays on social justice movements appear in Truthout and Popular Resistance. www.riverasun.com

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Remembering Nonviolent History: Freedom Rides

Freedom-Rides-by-Rivera-5-5-16By May 1961, federal law had already ruled that segregation on interstate, public buses was illegal. Southern states, however, maintained segregation in seating, and at bus station bathrooms, waiting rooms and drinking fountains. The Interstate Commerce Commission refused to take action to enforce federal law. To change this, the Civil Rights Movement (CORE, SNCC, NAACP) began a series of Freedom Rides on May 4th, 1961, 55 years ago. By the end of the campaign, 436 individuals had participated in at least 60 separate Freedom Rides, ultimately forcing the Interstate Commerce Commission to enforce federal law and desegregate interstate bus services.

The Freedom Riders drew inspiration from the Journey of Reconciliation in 1947, led by Bayard Rustin and George Houser. The Freedom Rides campaigns followed on the heels of the highly visible lunch counter sit-in campaigns that began in 1960. Diane Nash, a veteran of the Nashville, Tennessee, campaign, was one of the lead organizers of the Freedom Rides, and it was at her urging that the demonstrators persevered through the extreme violence, carrying on to success despite life-threatening situations.

The Freedom Riders’ nonviolent strategy led to careful and effective tactics, placing themselves symbolically in challenging places—black riders sitting up front, white and black sitting together—but with one rider observing Southern segregation customs in order to avoid arrest and contact CORE to arrange bail for those jailed.

Strategy, training, and discipline were essential components of preparation for the Freedom Riders. Over the four months of the campaign, they were beaten, arrested, attacked by mobs; the buses were set on fire, the KKK surrounded them and threw tear gas into the locked buses; at times, Greyhound and Trailways bus lines refused to protect or transport them; hospitals denied care and ambulances would not carry injured Freedom Riders. All Freedom Riders practiced flawless nonviolent discipline despite massive provocation.

On May 14, Mother’s Day, in Anniston, Alabama, Ku Klux Klansmen, some still in church attire, attacked the first of two buses arriving and departing from the station. The driver tried pull away, but was blocked by KKK members. The tires were slashed. A few miles outside of town, the crippled bus was forced to stop by the KKK, who firebombed it. The mob held the doors shut, intending to burn the riders to death. The riders escaped the bus, but were then severely beaten. Only warning shots fired into the air by highway patrolmen prevented the riders from being lynched. The second of the two buses arriving in Anniston, Alabama, likewise faced violent attacks, leaving Freedom Riders semi-conscious in the back of the bus.

Throughout the summer, the Freedom Riders persevered, facing violence, intimidation, and arrests. The nation was shocked by both the violence and the knowledge that southern authorities were ignoring federal laws—the fearless nonviolence of the Freedom Riders gained sympathy and respect. The Freedom Riders escalated until September, when the ICC, faced with the likelihood of more nonviolent direct action campaigns, issued new policies enforcing the desegregation of interstate buses. On November 1, 1961, when the new ICC rules took effect, passengers were permitted to sit wherever they pleased on interstate buses and trains; “white” and “colored” signs were removed from the terminals; racially segregated drinking fountains, toilets, and waiting rooms serving interstate customers were desegregated; and the lunch counters began serving all customers, regardless of race.

The Freedom Rides are a powerful example of the use of nonviolent direct action to enforce justice and fair laws. Remember, by 1961, federal law forbid segregation on interstate buses. Using nonviolent action, the Freedom Riders exercised their rights, upheld the law, and refused to cooperate with injustice.

ARivera New Hatuthor/Activist Rivera Sun, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of The Dandelion Insurrection, Billionaire Buddha and Steam Drills, Treadmills, and Shooting Stars, the cohost of Love (and Revolution) Radio, and the cofounder of the Love-In-Action Network. She is a trainer and social media coordinator for Campaign Nonviolence and Pace e Bene. Sun attended the James Lawson Institute on Strategic Nonviolent Resistance in 2014 and her essays on social justice movements appear in Truthout and Popular Resistance. www.riverasun.com

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Yes to Assertive, No to Aggressive by Tom Hastings

"Nonviolence" by Democracy Chronicles. CC 2.0 See the article "Martin Luther King Jr’s Nonviolent Strategy" for the original image on Democracy Chronicles. https://democracychronicles.com/nonviolent-strategy/

“Nonviolence” by Democracy Chronicles. CC 2.0 See the article “Martin Luther King Jr’s Nonviolent Strategy” for the original image.

I teach and write in the field of Peace and Conflict Studies, with a special focus on strategic nonviolence. It is a rich field, growing in its scholarship and its widespread usage. I’m so enthused by this—the more we wage our conflicts with nonviolence the lower the costs.

Counting the costs of conflict, we normally think of blood and treasure, of casualties and expense. We are slowly beginning to also count other costs, including our environment, our relationships, our civil rights, our human rights, our metrics of democracy, and more. Nonviolence is superior to violence in every way if we read the research and consider all the costs.

Nonviolence can fail, of course, and in the most robust of struggles—trying to overthrow a dictator, for example—nonviolent struggle only works about 53 percent of the time. Of course violent insurgency only succeeds 26 percent of the time, about half as often as does nonviolence. This is disturbing to those who define revolution as violent. I hope they get over it. Wake up and smell the flowers instead of the cordite…

One secret to nonviolent success is communication. When we are quiet the injustices we see or suffer are allowed to continue. When we are aggressive—either violent or demeaning, threatening, and insulting—that strengthens the resolve of the opponent and progress is unlikely. The best path to victory is assertion—visualize a thin bright line between you and the oppressor. Shrink back from the line and nothing changes. Charge over the line and all defenses spring into counter-aggression, counterattack. But go up to the line with insistent civil assertion, creative and resilient, and your chances for winning your objectives are radically increased.

These principles are basic, but ignored all too often, as we see in many conflicts domestic and transnational, in families and workplaces, in neighborhoods and in towns, in regions and states. The destructive, adversarial conflicts that result are often heartbreaking to observe. From a belligerent North Korean dictator to a misogynist Donald Trump, the results are not impressive. Ruling over others is a poor path to sustainable gains and doing so in an aggressive manner will only generate pushback. If that resistance is civil but insistent, assertive but not aggressive, it can achieve what no one thought possible.

If I had predicted publicly in 1985 that the Philippines would see Marcos deposed without a single fired shot, that the Berlin Wall would fall in a massive nonviolent uprising, that Nelson Mandela would be liberated and apartheid would end without a widely predicted bloodbath, that Pinochet would fall in Chile to mass nonviolent power, and that Slobodan Milosevic would create horrific wars in the Balkans but would be deposed by nonviolence, I might have been diagnosed as delusional.

These cases and 1,000 more are chronicled in a Swarthmore database that is growing constantly. We are humans—we have great big brains that are hard-wired for all possible responses, from violent to nonviolent, which makes us the unique species neurologically capable of infinite, illimitable choice. Let’s be wise about it.

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Dr. Tom H. Hastings is Founding Director of PeaceVoice

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Love-In-Action Taos Builds Winter Momentum Through Film Screenings

Rivera Sun introducing Gasland film at Moby Dickens Bookshop.

Love-In-Action Taos is activism at high-altitude … which means the winters are cold and snowy. We don’t do so much protesting outdoors during this season, but we keep active anyway! This winter, we’re screening documentaries at the local bookstore, Moby Dickens. We’ve selected a few films out of the thousands our group has collectively seen. Here’s the line-up for the next few months. Popcorn will be served (vegan and nonvegan, GMO-free). We accept donations, but no one is turned away.

Full Winter Schedule of Movies At Moby’s:

TheForgottenBomb_KeyArt_DVD.wideaThe Forgotten Bomb Sat, Jan 10th at 7pm w/ filmmaker Bud Ryan speaking afterwards. “Join filmmaker Bud Ryan on an epic journey to discover what the Bomber can learn from the Bombed and what the true state of the nuclear threat is today.” With Los Alamos National Laboratory just down the road and the continuing waste storage crisis at the WIPP facility, this is a timely and relevant film to witness as we enter the 70th year since the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We are also very fortunate to have filmmaker Bud Ryan in attendance, so please tell all your friends! Watch trailer here.

A Force More Powerful Sat, Jan 17th at 7pm This groundbreaking film explores one of the 20th century’s most important but least understood stories: how nonviolent power has overcome oppression and authoritarian rule all over the world. Narrated by Ben Kingsley, and nominated for an Emmy, A Force More Powerful premiered on PBS in September 2000. Watch the trailer.

Gasland Part II, Sat, Feb 7th, at 7pm After the eerie and unsettling Gasland I screening at Moby Dickens, we’re substituting fact for horror in our film series. GASLAND PART II will provide you with a compelling narrative, shocking facts, clear science on the largest domestic drilling campaign in modern history and an understanding of why drilling can never be made safe. From faucets lighting on fire to dead cows to a bevy of healthcare complaints to entire rivers contaminated with waste fracking fluid, this issue is catastrophe wreaking havoc on our nation. Watch the trailer.

the_salt_of_the_earth_poster-2Salt of the Earth, Sat, March 7th, at 7pm Based on an actual strike against the Empire Zinc Mine in New Mexico, the film deals with the prejudice against the Mexican-American workers, who struck to attain wage parity with Anglo workers in other mines and to be treated with dignity by the bosses. In the end, the greatest victory for the workers and their families is the realization that prejudice and poor treatment are conditions that are not always imposed by outside forces. This powerful film is one of the few films to have been blacklisted by the US government. Today, it is considered a masterpiece and a treasure. Rivera’s note: This film is outstanding! Incredible cinematography, good acting, and startlingly progressive message. Watch the original and very entertaining trailer.

Bonus film: Cowspiracy, Mural Room, Friday, April 24 (time TBA & there may be an admission charge.)
“Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret” is a groundbreaking feature-length environmental documentary following intrepid filmmaker Kip Andersen as he uncovers the most destructive industry facing the planet today – and investigates why the world’s leading environmental organizations are too afraid to talk about it. This film is being presented by the Vegan Meet-up Group as part of their Earth Day event series. *Rivera’s note: Not so much a vegan film as a must-see for anyone concerned about climate change. We made an exception in our Moby’s series to include this film because it’s so important for everyone to know about, watch, and tell their friends about. It’s life-changing.Watch the trailer.

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“Seeds of Change Workshop” – Rivera Sun’s Powerful Workshop on Strategic Nonviolent Action

Seeds-of-Change-WorkshopLove-In-Action co-founder Rivera Sun brings her powerful workshop to Taos, NM before embarking on a 40+ city tour. Not local to Taos? You’re in luck! She’s on her way to you … and she’s also teaching Love-in-Action Workshops. See her full tour schedule and contact her here.

Come to the Seeds of Change Workshop on Sat, Jan 24th 2-6pm at Moby Dickens Bookshop, Taos, NM:

Ordinary people like you have made change using the tools of Dr. King, Gandhi, Jesus, and Cesar Chavez. Learn these strategies for change and apply them in your community. This workshop covers the basic dynamics and strategies of nonviolent action. Participants discover how to envision and build campaigns, become familiar with the 198 Methods of Nonviolent Action, the Pillars of Support, the Spectrum of Allies, and learn to connect the dots between the many issues our communities face. Bring your friends, neighbors, elders, and students. Together we’ll explore how ordinary people can make extraordinary change!

$30/person, 4hrs long, Facilitated by Rivera Sun
Register at the door or by calling (575) 776-3973 (scholarships available, please call.)

 

Pssst … here’s Rivera Sun’s Love-In-Action Workshop description. Very exciting!

Heroes 1 Group ShotLove-In-Action for the Times We’re In! Workshop w/ Rivera Sun
Love in action is the phrase used by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Buddhist monk and peace activist, Thich Nhat Hanh, to describe what happens when “the heart bursts open and springs into action!” This workshop brings you hope, courage, and practical skills for being love in action. Drawing from inspiring stories of nonviolent action, you’ll learn how to bring people together, create a plan, and become a vibrant part of the growing Movement of Movements that is sweeping across the nation and into our lives!

See her full tour schedule and contact her here.

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70,000 Cranes For Peace – Send a Creative Message of Peace to the Cradle of the Bomb

70000 Cranes for PeaceLove-In-Action Taos has joined in with a beautiful project you may want to participate in. Send a creative message of peace to the “cradle of the bomb” to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the horrific bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This year, as people around the world take action to commemorate the massacre and ban the bomb, Campaign Nonviolence and Upaya Zen Center are calling on citizens to fold 70,000 paper cranes for peace to be brought to Los Alamos National Laboratory, on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Days. Sign up here.

Sadako statue with paper cranes in Japan.

Sadako statue with paper cranes in Japan.

Seventy years ago, the United States dropped two nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing 80,000 women, children, and men instantly; and over 150,000 in total. The symbolism of the paper crane began with Sadako Sasaki, who was two years old when the blast from the Hiroshima bomb threw her out a window. She was ten when purple spots formed on her arms and legs. Hospitalized for leukemia in Feb 1955, the popular girl died in October 1955. In her last year of life, she folded 1300 paper cranes as a prayer for healing. The paper crane is now an international symbol of peace, and a poignant reminder of the human costs of nuclear bombs.

On Aug 6-9th, hundreds of citizens will be gathering in New Mexico to embody Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous words regarding nuclear weapons, “It is no longer a choice between violence or nonviolence. It is nonviolence or nonexistence.” They will be participating in a National Conference on Nonviolence and traveling to the heart of nuclear weapons research, Los Alamos National Laboratory, to hold a vigil, a peace march, and deliver 70,000 paper cranes that have been folded by people like you.

Love-In-Action Taos folded paper cranes designed by Taos member, Paul Gutches.

Love-In-Action Taos folded paper cranes designed by Taos member, Paul Gutches.

Come to New Mexico in person or send a delegation of paper cranes to represent you, your family, friends, and neighbors, your peace and justice center, church or spiritual group, school or classroom. Learn how to fold cranes and sign up here.

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Love-In-Action Co-Founder Rivera Sun Spreads the Seeds of Change in Spring 2015

Love-In-Action cofounder, Rivera Sun, reading from her novel, The Dandelion Insurrection.

Love-In-Action cofounder, Rivera Sun, reading from her novel, The Dandelion Insurrection.

Rivera Sun, along with her partner, Dariel Garner (both cofounders of the Love-In-Action Network), are sweeping the West Coast, Rocky Mountains, East Coast, and the Great Lakes Region in Spring 2015 in a nationwide tour, coordinated with Campaign Nonviolence. Teaching nonviolent action workshops and doing readings from her book, The Dandelion Insurrection – a powerful novel on nonviolent change – Rivera Sun is spreading the seeds of courage and strategies for change. Love-In-Action groups, established or still-forming are invited to contact her through Campaign Nonviolence to schedule a visit.

“This is a great opportunity to convene your local group together and invigorate it with new skills, exciting information, and a feeling of solidarity and connection from people all over the country,” Rivera Sun says.

Sun will be visiting 24+ cities and towns speaking, reading from her novels, and teaching workshops on the strategies of nonviolent action behind The Dandelion Insurrection’s story of change. See the full list of cities and schedule Rivera Sun in your town here.

In her workshops, the powerhouse activist and author brings a focused approach to the dynamics and strategy of nonviolent action, covering essentials for planning campaigns, including classics such as Pillars of Support, Spectrum of Allies, 198 Methods of Nonviolent Action, and more. Applicable to anyone working to gain living wages, prevent police brutality, ban fracking, end the climate crisis, stop wars, halt drones, or any other social justice issue, these workshops share the skills of planning powerful campaigns that use nonviolence effectively to make change.

Interested in joining the ever-expanding series of communities participating in the tour? Visit Campaign Nonviolence and set up your workshop, speaking engagement, or book reading today!

Rivera Sun leading a strategic nonviolent action workshop in Madrid, NM.

Rivera Sun leading a strategic nonviolent action workshop in Madrid, NM.

Rivera Sun is the author of The Dandelion Insurrection, and Steam Drills, Treadmills, and Shooting Stars, the cohost of Occupy Radio, and the cofounder of the Love-In-Action Network. She is also the social media coordinator for Campaign Nonviolence and Pace e Bene. Sun is a graduate of the James Lawson Institute 2014 and her essays on social justice movements appear in Truthout and Popular Resistance. . www.riverasun.com

Locations Currently Scheduled, Exact Dates TBA:

West Coast Tour March-April 2015
San Diego, CA
Santa Cruz, CA
Petaluma, CA March 23rd
Ukiah, CA March 24th & 25th
Chico, CA
Eugene, OR
Leavenworth, WA
Seattle, WA
Portland, OR April 18th

Rocky Mountain Tour Late-April 2015
Boise, ID April 21st
Cheyenne, WY
Boulder, CO
Denver, CO
Crestone, CO
Taos, NM
 Spring date TBA, Winter Workshop on Jan 24th, 2015
Santa Fe, NM
 Spring date TBA, Winter Workshop on Jan 24th, 2015
Madrid, NM Spring date TBA

East Coast Tour May-June 2015
Austin, TX 
May 9th
Houston, TX 
May 10th
Fayetteville, AR
Washington, DC
Fryeburg, Maine

Great Lakes Region June 2015
Newaygo, MI (in the works)
Madison, WI

Not on the list? Sign up here at Campaign Nonviolence.
For questions, contact Rivera Sun at rivera@riverasun.com

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Only Photos Can Capture Love-In-Action Taos’ Outrageously Active Six Months

Heroes 1 Group Shot

The Unsung Heroes: Whistleblowers, Activists, and Muckrakers Procession won “Most Patriotic” in the 4th of July Parade.

It’s hard to keep up with Love-In-Action Taos.  (This website certainly can’t!) Since forming in March 2014, this small town group has organized over forty actions and events, taking part in the Global Climate Convergence, March Against Monsanto, the local agriculture movement, three peace vigils for Palestine, Pax Christi’s Hiroshima Day Vigil at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and won “Most Patriotic” in the 4th of July Parade for their Unsung Heroes: Whistleblowers, Activists, and Muckrakers procession.

Here are just a few photos from the group’s wonderful activities. Enjoy!

Love-In-Action demonstrates in the rain, the sun, and even after dark … while war rages, Love-In-Action speaks up for peace and nonviolence!

Love-In-Action demonstrates in the rain, the sun, and even after dark … while war rages, Love-In-Action speaks up for peace and nonviolence!

Growing gardens, sharing food, swapping seeds, bringing loaves of fresh baked bread to gatherings … it's not just protests. Love-In-Action stands up for life in many ways!

Growing gardens, sharing food, swapping seeds, bringing loaves of fresh baked bread to gatherings … it’s not just protests. Love-In-Action stands up for life in many ways!

From porch gardens to one-acre fields, Love-In-Action Taos members love to grow food! We understand that local agriculture sits in the nexus of climate, water, poverty, and community resilience issues.

From porch gardens to one-acre fields, Love-In-Action Taos members love to grow food! We understand that local agriculture sits in the nexus of climate, water, poverty, and community resilience issues.

Love-In-Action Taos visits our City Councilors … this happens to be about a name-change for a local park.

Love-In-Action Taos visits our City Councilors … this happens to be about a name-change for a local park.

Love-In-Action Taos helped host the local Global Climate Convergence for People, Planet, Peace over Profits. This is an educational talk in the Historic Taos County Courthouse. Photo by David Cortez

Love-In-Action Taos helped host the local Global Climate Convergence for People, Planet, Peace over Profits. This is an educational talk in the Historic Taos County Courthouse. Photo by David Cortez

Planting a Cherry Tree during the Global Peace Walk.

Planting a Cherry Tree during the Global Peace Walk.

Schoolkids from Penasco joined the Community Parade during the Global Climate Convergence, bringing along the recycled plastic dragon they built!

Schoolkids from Penasco joined the Community Parade during the Global Climate Convergence, bringing along the recycled plastic dragon they built!

Love-In-Action Taos joins Pax Christi and John Dear for the Annual Sackcloth and Ashes Hirsoshima Day Peace Vigil at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Love-In-Action Taos joins Pax Christi and John Dear for the Annual Sackcloth and Ashes Hirsoshima Day Peace Vigil at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

We are the media! Love-In-Action Taos proclaims, holding up cameras for the camera. We are the news: both the subject and reporters!

We are the media! Love-In-Action Taos proclaims, holding up cameras for the camera. We are the news: both the subject and reporters!

Love-In-Action Taos painted nearly 100 banners of inspirational leaders for social justice, both living and passed on.

Love-In-Action Taos painted nearly 100 banners of inspirational leaders for social justice, both living and passed on.

Joining the Great March for Climate Action as the cross-country marchers arrive in Taos, NM.

Joining the Great March for Climate Action as the cross-country marchers arrive in Taos, NM.

"Gaza = Guernica" - a 7 x 15 ft adaptation of Picasso's famous painting being prepared for the Aug 9th demonstration for Palestine.

“Gaza = Guernica” – a 7 x 15 ft adaptation of Picasso’s famous painting being prepared for the Aug 9th demonstration for Palestine.

 

March Against Monsanto becomes a colorful celebration of life when Love-In-Action gets involved!

March Against Monsanto becomes a colorful celebration of life when Love-In-Action gets involved!

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Please Welcome, Love-In-Action Wenatchee, WA!

10606103_10203202715683787_87930954337170232_nLove-In-Action Wenatchee is bringing heart, art, and creativity to Washington State. Please welcome our newest Love-In-Action group, organized by Julie Quinn-Huffman and friends after reading Rivera Sun’s novel, The Dandelion Insurrection. Already planning actions, the group will join in Unify.org’s Aug 8th Global Meditation for Peace. Julie’s daughter, Grace Silvermoon, created these beautiful, heart-warming invitational fliers to hand out around town. Wouldn’t you say yes, if you were handed one of these? Unify.org has more information about the Global Meditation for Peace on Aug 8th. It takes place anywhere and everywhere. You can register your own participation or your group’s at register@ www.unify.org

The Love-In-Action Network just became bolder and brighter! Welcome!

If you’re looking for Love-In-Action in North-Central Washington, contact Julie Quinn-Huffman at juliequinnhuffman(at)frontier.com 

Not in Washington? Find a group in your area. 

 

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